Emily Berry - New York


One the WEB www.b3w.org
 
“Memorable, intelligent, strong.” —Eva Yaa Asantewaa, Infinite Body
“Violent but engaging” —Clare Croft, The Washington Post.
“Clear expression of idea in movement” – Maura Donahue, Culturbot
Artist Biography


 
 
Artist Biography
Emily Berry is the Artistic Director of B3W, which has performed in the US, England and Mexico. In New York City, B3W has performed at Henry Street Settlement, Dance New Amsterdam, Dixon Place, BAAD!, the 92nd Street Y, The Irondale Center as part of FlicFest, the International Dance Festival NYC, the DUMBO Dance Festival, the Manhattan Movement Arts Center, and the Cool New York Dance Festival. The company has also premiered two dance films in Maryland and in Switzerland. B3W received the Mondo Cane Commission at Dixon Place where they premiered Confined in September 2010 with a three-week run. Emily was also commissioned to set a piece on Ann Arbor Dance Works.

Emily has performed with danceTactics/Keith Thompson, Boris Willis Moves, Dakshina/Daniel Phoenix Singh & Company, Restless Native Dance/Tamieca McCloud, Lesole’s Dance Project, and Ashe Moyubba/Alafia Afro-Cuban Folkloric Dance Ensemble.

Emily is a Certified Movement Analyst. She also has a MFA in dance from George Mason University and a Bachelor of Dance Arts from the University of Michigan. She has taught at Oakland University, George Mason University, Coppin State University, Montgomery College, and the Community College of Baltimore County. She has also taught master classes for ACDFA, Goucher College, the College of William and Mary, the University of Michigan, and numerous dance intensives. She is currently an assistant professor of dance at Queensborough Community College. My process begins broad and allows specific ideas and stories to emerge. We remain open throughout the creative process, leaving room for more stories and ideas to emerge as we work. I’m interested in how the topic I’ve chosen resonates within our own lives, as well as within society. My work develops through intense discussions and detailed movement investigations. The improvisations are drawn from an emotional place with the focus on “intention of concept”. My approach is a fusion of my experiences in dance, theater, and film, and my background as a Certified Movement Analyst. With an unwavering commitment to concept, I address every moment with a fine toothed-comb.

Artist Statement
Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) and I first collaborated in 1998. Fourteen years later, our artistic practices continue to weave together our shared concepts in art making. While we come from different disciplines, our motivation for creating our art, our approach to our art making, and the subjects we are drawn to, are exactly the same. We both have a strong desire to bring to light unseen and under-represented topics, relationships, and stories with a strong emotional content that pulls at your heartstrings. I find it incredibly useful and beneficial to come together with other artists to network and develop relationships. I do not believe in creating art in a vacuum. This experience would allow me to expand the breadth of my circle, which is always stimulating as well as creates the possibility for future collaborations and cross sections. Yes, I have participated in several Festivals before. The ones that work best are the ones where the artists that are coming together have an interest in supporting each others' work as well as developing relationships. Dialogue about process, practice, and resources as well as experiencing each others' work proves most beneficial. “After” (6 minutes for one dancer) is about making the choice to pick oneself up after a tragic moment, years of suffering, or a painful experience and move on. “After”

What do you hope to gain from this experience?
I find it incredibly useful and beneficial to come together with other artists to network and develop relationships. I do not believe in creating art in a vacuum. This experience would allow me to expand the breadth of my circle, which is always stimulating as well as creates the possibility for future collaborations and cross sections.

Have you participated in Festivals before? If so, what worked and what didn't work for you? What would you like to see more or less of?
Yes, I have participated in several Festivals before. The ones that work best are the ones where the artists that are coming together have an interest in supporting each others' work as well as developing relationships.   Dialogue about process, practice, and resources as well as experiencing each others' work proves most beneficial.
 
What the artist will be sharing at the Festival
Emily is sharing creative expression at CPR (a group work), Center Stage Theater (solo), and the Pescadrome (solo with local violiist)
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